Outdoor Library Homepage: Articles, Tips, Outdoor Gear Reviews
Library Home   |   Hunting   |   Fishing   |   Camping   |   Boating   |   Videos

Choosing Gear Bags and Tackle Boxes
written by Jason Akl

Fly fishing tackle boxes can be broken down into a few different categories depending on what they will be storing.
Click here to return to the last page you viewed.  Previous Page

Click here to print the content on this page.  Print This Page

Making an investment to keep your equipment safe and neatly stored away will save you money in the long run.

Basically, fly-fishing tackle boxes are designed to hold all those odd and funny shaped items that are so necessary to the sport we all love. Items such as fly rods, waders, and fishing vests tend not to fit well in standard tackle boxes. Having proper storage for your fly fishing items will keep items in better shape since they are protected from the nicks and scratches of travel. Additionally, having items packed away neatly saves room and prevents you from forgetting important items when going on long trips.


No matter what the need, whether it is simply protecting your gear or just a place to organize tiny flies, a tackle box is made to suit your individual needs. Fly fishing tackle boxes can be broken down into a few different categories depending on what they are going to be storing or protecting.  

 

Rod Tubes and Rod Cases

 

The purpose of rod tubes and rod cases is pretty straight forward -- to protect your rod from damage while traveling or storing. Since fly rods are one of the most expensive pieces of fly fishing tackle, owning a good rod case is a necessity. In general rod cases come in a few different types and styles. The first style is your basic hard-cased rod tubes. These are best suited for transporting your rod long distances. Just be sure to purchase a rod tube that has some sort of locking mechanism for the top or a place to clip a lock into. The second type of rod cases is a rod tube with a reel cover attached. These cases allow a broken down rod to be slipped into the case and secured without the removal of the fly reel. This second type of rod case is a great idea for the avid fly fishermen who fishes close to home. Being able to keep your fly rod strung up and ready for action is a great advantage for those who only get a few hours to fish or like to jump to a number of different spots per day. The last type of rod case is the rod sock. Like the rod tube this type of case requires the reel to be removed before storing the rod. Unlike the other two cases this type of case really does not do much in the way of protecting your rod. It simple covers it keeping dirt and debris away. If you are going to spend hard earned money on a rod of yours dreams, protect your investment by purchasing a quality case.


Reel cases can come in a wide variety of styles but generally most are soft suede types or hard plastic.

Fly Reel Cases

 

In general fly reels, especially the higher end models, are pretty tough, but why chance having dirt, dust, and debris clogging the gears. Reel cases can come in a wide variety of styles but generally most are soft suede types or hard plastic. If you are going to be storing your reel for any length of time or traveling abroad hard plastic cases are a must. These cases are great because they keep the reel from harms way while usually having storage for extra spools, spare lines and all the other little things you might want to bring along. Suede cases are good for the fisherman who gets out occasionally and wants protection simply from dirt and debris. These cases are good if you plan on keeping your reel in some sort of tackle box seeing as they do not take up very much room. A good idea of any case that you might be looking into buying is that they can be used while still on your rod. Suede cases are particularly good for this and can be used to protect your reel between fishing spots.


Fly Fishing Gear Holders and Tackle Bags

 

Gear bags are very handy pieces of fly fishing equipment. They are perfect items to organize the many small and intricate tools you use everyday while at the same time providing a great place to stick wet waders and boots, fly boxes and virtually everything else you could use for a days fishing. What to look for in a tackle bag varies depending on what you actually will be using the bag for. In the most general sense tackle bags should be constructed with a few key components:


1. Heavy duty nylon fabric that is rip resistant and double stitched in heavy wear areas.

2. Large easy-to-use corrosion resistant zippers.

3. Includes interior/exterior storage compartments of varying sizes.

4. Waterproof exterior coating

5. Padded shoulder strap that is suspended from offset D-rings


Fly Boxes

 

Out of all the different types of gear and tackle cases available, fly boxes are the one item that most people put a lot of thought into when buying. Fly boxes come in such a wide variety of styles that finding the one that is right for your needs is not always as easy as it seems. First and foremost, you need a fly box that is watertight. There is nothing worse then opening your fly box after a recent fishing trip and seeing that your flies have gotten wet and are now losing their colors and rusting. During a days fishing if you are wading deep fast flows, there is a good

Plastic boxes are probably the cheapest and most versatile of the different types of boxes available.

chance that you might slip in and get yourself and your personal items soaked.  Having a fly box that keeps your prized flies safe and dry is a must. Another key feature a quality fly box should have is some sort of easy to use locking mechanism. Cold weather conditions plays havoc on hands and fingers making opening snaps and intricate locks mechanisms tedious and time consuming.  As far as the inside of the fly box is concerned, two choices are available to fly anglers. The most common type of fly boxes use ribbed foam to hold flies in place; but fly boxes that use small compartments to store flies are available. While the small compartment boxes are good for storing dries and nymphs, foam insert boxes are great for storing many different sized flies from tiny midges to large streamer patterns. The last real consideration to take into account when buying a fly is the exterior material. Fly boxes come in anything from wood and plastic to metal with each having their own respective advantages and disadvantages. Wood boxes are beautiful sculpted pieces of work, but over time with exposure to the extreme conditions, they become faded and potentially can crack or splinter. Metal boxes also look very attractive when new, but have a tendency to scratch and rust easily. Plastic boxes are probably the cheapest and most versatile of the different types of boxes available but durability is sometimes an issue.


Overall when you are considering purchasing a tackle holder, rod tube, or fly box you should remember that these storage items will be protecting your pieces of equipment that are probably expensive, but also hold some sentimental value. Making an investment to keeping your equipment safe and neatly stored away will save you money in the long run and make future trips out on the water more enjoyable.

Outdoor Library Homepage: Articles, Tips, Outdoor Gear Reviews
Library Home   |   Hunting   |   Fishing   |   Camping   |   Boating