Those Were The Days: The Life & Times of a Florida Keys Fishing Guide Book by George F. Hommell Jr.

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In the remarkable memoir Those Were The Days: The Life & Times of a Florida Keys Fishing Guide, author George F. Hommell Jr. shares his adventures as a Florida Keys fishing guide in a bygone era. Hommell started fishing the flats off South Florida right after WWII, and started guiding in the 1950s as a pioneer in fishing tarpon and bonefish on light tackle, and helped refine the techniques for poling for bonefish. His deep respect for the environment inspired him to establish the ethics of flats fishing and raise awareness of conservation, as well as rules and regulations through both guiding and cofounding World Wide Sportsman. Those Were The Days is full of honest and often humorous true tales of fishing with an impressive list of notable clients, including Ted Williams, Jack Nicklaus, Johnny Morris, and the 41st president of the United States, George H.W. Bush. The book covers South Florida, as well as the Yucatan and Central American coasts. Those Were The Days by George F. Hommell Jr. is sure to be a saltwater fishing classic; it contains 178 pages, lots of nostalgic photos, and a forward by President George H.W. Bush.
ISBN-13: 978-0996500203.

  • Trophy catches of bonefish, tarpon, and more
  • Written by the pioneer of flats fishing, George F. Hommell Jr.
  • Leader of ethics fishing and conservation awareness
  • Full of true fishing tales and nostalgic photos
  • Tales of fishing with Ted Williams, Jack Nicklaus, and George H.W. Bush
  • 178 pages of adventures

"George's reputation as a guide and as a pioneer of light tackle and fly fishing for bonefish, permit and tarpon is legendary. George inspired us all—anglers young and old alike—to dream about catching our next big fish and to better understand the importance of conservation." —Johnny Morris

Web ID: 176585