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Traditions Kentucky Rifle .50 Caliber Muzzleloader Kit

   

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Caliber
Stock
Finish
Quantity Price & availability

.50

Wood

White

  • $309.99

  • SKU: 1329267

  • In Stock
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Build yourself a classic with this do it yourself kit. This Traditions™ Kentucky Rifle .50 Caliber Muzzleloader Kit starts with an unfinished select hardwoods stock and octagonal white 33-1/2'' barrel. Barrel sports a 1 in 66'' twist. Kit also features brass furniture, fixed blade sights, a percussion style hammer, trigger guard, and wooden ramrod. Overall length: 49''. Weight: 7 lbs.
Manufacturer model #: KRC52206.

  • All you need to build a .50 caliber Kentucky Rifle
  • Hardwoods stock
  • 33 1/2'' octagonal barrel
  • 1 in 66'' twist
  • Brass furniture and inlays
  • Fixed blade sights
  • Percussion hammer
  • Wooden ramrod
Rated 3.8 out of 5 by 13 reviewers.
Rated 4 out of 5 by Good purchase I purchased one of these kits a few years ago and have used it many times. Fairly easy to build. I did the lock fitting with carving tools, I'm not steady enough for a dremmel. I didn't care for the brass joint so used a piece of hardwood instead, turned out great. First shot from the bench was dead center at 25 yards, can't ask for more than that. I have done well at freehand competitions despite nay sayers with more expensive guns. Highly recommended. June 12, 2014
Rated 5 out of 5 by NIce Finished Rifle I see a few reviews of some folks who did not give this kit a very good review. It is typical of all of these types of kits. you need to have a good working knowledge of how to use sand paper and a Dremel tool. The Dremel is absolutely invaluable to making this an enjoyable project. Both the wood parts and the brass parts will need some course and fine adjusting. For the money this is a great deal. I have seen these kits in finely finished form selling for four times the price of the kit. Take your time and pay attention to detail and your project will be a masterpiece. The Rifle shoots straight and is very consistent. I am a target shooter so I can't speak for how it handles in the bush. You will need to clean the bore often to prevent the push rod from being too hard to push the ball and patch down. This is not a disadvantage, just a fact of life. I highly recommend purchasing a ball starter for this rifle. December 13, 2013
Rated 1 out of 5 by Poor Quality I received the Kentucky rifle as a Christmas present from my wife in 2010. Right out of the box I noticed 1 screw missing during the pre assembly inventory. Second the brass butt plate & trigger guard were warped so badly that I wasn’t sure if I could use them. I was able to adapt the stock (lots of unnecessary sanding) to accommodate the warped butt plate. The trigger guard however broke right at the screw hole when I tried to install it following Traditions supplied instructions. Third the supplied hammer assembly had to be completely disassembled & reworked in order to function properly. Forth the stock joining plated (it’s the brass plate that fits between the buttstock & forestock) was to thin & left a sizable gap between the two stocks. The gap was due to the forestock being cut a 16th to short. So I went to the local hardware store & bought a thicker piece of brass using the old one as a pattern to cut out the new one. Dealing with Traditions customer service to get the missing screw & new trigger guard was not a major issue. Trying to catch them when they’re open is. They replaced the missing screw free of charge the trigger guard cost me $28. When I explained to the rep that the guard should have never passed QC & been shipped with the kit. I was told that since it broke on installation it was my fault. The customer service rep also told me that I should have used a torch to get the guard to fit. Out of the 6 or 7 black powder rifles I’ve built to date I’ve never once had to use a torch to make parts fit until I received this Traditions kit. In conclusion due to the poor quality of the parts in this kit I would not recommend it to anyone. The price is what makes this kit attractive. In the end you’ll have better success & an overall nicer looking Kentucky rifle if you spend a little more on a higher quality kit. Personally I’m apprehensive of buying any Tradition’s kit after this experience. April 7, 2011
Rated 5 out of 5 by What is was looking for This kit is good for a winter project like doing. It takes a lot of sanding if you what it to look good.To assemble the rifle follow the instructions and you can't be wrong. I found it simple and it's a time kill if you need something to do. September 30, 2010
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2 years, 9 months ago
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A: 
The barrel is rifled and has a 1 in 66 inch twist. The rifle is very accurate for targets less than 100 yards. I have not shot targets any farther than that so as far as long range accuracy, I do not know.
8 months ago
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 - Monett, MO
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A: 
The barrel is rifled in a 1 in 66'' twist.
1 year, 10 months ago
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A: 
Yes - It's a "rifle" not a musket. The description specifies "1 in 66" twist"
2 years, 8 months ago
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 - Winnsboro
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A: 
it is rifled barrel
2 years, 9 months ago
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3 years, 9 months ago
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A: 
Most of these stocks are made of Walnut, and it is a very hard wood. It will brake easy in small area where the wood is thin, do to the in-letting where the lock or trigger will be fitted.
3 years, 2 months ago
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 - North Texas
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The stock is made with unfinished select hardwoods stock.
3 years, 2 months ago
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4 years, 7 months ago
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 - NORTHERN MICHIGAN
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A: 
I don't think any of the Traditions Barrels are heat treated. Or proof tested for that matter.. Google it. You'll be surprised at the lack of quality..
3 years, 5 months ago
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 - Ontario Canada
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yes it is
3 years, 11 months ago
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 - high river, alberta,canada
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A: 
Yes it is but sanding the stock is to finish it is wrong. Knock it down with 4 0000 steal wool first. wipe it down and blow of the steal wool with a air hose. Just put on a coat of Tung oil. Shake it up real good before use...(Don't shake varnish if you decide to use it. It has to be stirred.)

Apply one coat, let it dry and use four 0000 steel wool to knock it down. Keep doing this until it has the finish you like. I don't get too carried away if it;s for hunting.
4 years, 11 months ago
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5 years, 7 months ago
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A: 
Given that this is a 50 cal. - it's not a squirrel gun.

Seriously, loaded properly, you could take game up through deer easily with this rifle. As with any firearm it is mostly about accuracy, practice and effective range.
5 years, 4 months ago
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5 years, 8 months ago
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You would need to check with the group holding the re-enactment. Most groups have their own standards for accuracy. Different guns were used in different battles and regions due to time of the battle, availability, and local preferences.
5 years, 7 months ago
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 - Springfield, MO
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