Strike King KVD Swim Jig

   

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Chartreuse Sexy Shad

Chartreuse Sexy Shad

1/4 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ14-538
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1940714

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Chartreuse Sexy Shad

Chartreuse Sexy Shad

3/8 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ38-538
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1940715

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Chartreuse Sexy Shad

Chartreuse Sexy Shad

1/2 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ12-538
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1940716

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Black Blue

Black Blue

1/4 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ14-2
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1207933

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Texas Craw

Texas Craw

1/4 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ14-8
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1207934

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Blue Shad

Blue Shad

1/4 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ14-27
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1207935

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Bluegill

Bluegill

1/4 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ14-34
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1207936

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Green Pumpkin

Green Pumpkin

1/4 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ14-46
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1207937

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Smokey Shad

Smokey Shad

1/4 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ14-57
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1207938

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Sexy Shad

Sexy Shad

1/4 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ14-590
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1531808

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Black Blue

Black Blue

3/8 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ38-2
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1207939

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Texas Craw

Texas Craw

3/8 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ38-8
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1207940

  • In Stock
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Blue Shad

Blue Shad

3/8 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ38-27
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1207941

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Bluegill

Bluegill

3/8 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ38-34
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1207942

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Green Pumpkin

Green Pumpkin

3/8 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ38-46
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1207943

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Smokey Shad

Smokey Shad

3/8 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ38-57
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1207944

  • Available for Backorder
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Sexy Shad

Sexy Shad

3/8 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ38-590
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1531809

  • Available for Backorder
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Black Blue

Black Blue

1/2 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ12-2
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1207927

  • In Stock
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Texas Craw

Texas Craw

1/2 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ12-8
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1207928

  • In Stock
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Blue Shad

Blue Shad

1/2 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ12-27
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1207929

  • In Stock
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Bluegill

Bluegill

1/2 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ12-34
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1207930

  • In Stock
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Green Pumpkin

Green Pumpkin

1/2 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ12-46
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1207931

  • In Stock
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Smokey Shad

Smokey Shad

1/2 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ12-57
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1207932

  • In Stock
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Sexy Shad

Sexy Shad

1/2 oz.

1

Hook Size:
4/0

Model:
KVDSJ12-590
  • $4.59

  • SKU: 1531810

  • Available for Backorder
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Strike King®'s exclusive Perfect Skirt blooms like no other giving this swim jig more action than any other swimming jig on the market. And with colors designed by Kevin himself, you'll be able to perfectly match whatever type of baitfish you're trying to mimic. The Kevin VanDam Swim Jig offers a unique head design featuring a true-tracking, natural profile along with a medium wire hook and extra-long shank to give you exactly what you need to produce monster strikes.

  • Unique head design
  • Natural profile
  • Medium wire hook
  • Extra-long shank

A masterpiece from a Bassmaster champ—a Bass Pro exclusive, made to Kevin's own specifications by Strike King!" I create a lot of baits for Strike King. They build the baits that I depend on in tournaments. I know that Strike King baits have components that are made to stand up to tough fishing conditions. Why would I fish anything else? The answer is simple -- Strike King lures are the best!"
Kevin VanDam

NOTE: The head will be either solid or scale, depending on current stock.

Strike King KVD Swim Jig 4.8 5 109 109
Great Lure I like this lure a lot. Have bought several of them and they've always performed well. I usually put a baby craw trailer on them. Swim great through cover and both pike and bass eat it. I like the way the skirts attached with no elastic. Hooks are sharp too. October 21, 2014
Preform well BUT I purchased 6 3/8 oz KVD Strike King swim jigs,they preformed well for about 2hrs then it seem that the epoxy let loose on the brush-guard.3 out of the six failed .Something that should probably be looked into. August 5, 2014
Awesome I have been smashing big bass on these...the trailer keeper works great...you dont have to change trailers as much as you normally do. May 15, 2014
kvd swim jig The Nvd swim jig works great in heav covey and has great action with the removable rattles. Bass seem to love it no matter what I put on it! May 14, 2014
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10 Questions | 82 Answers

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Q: 
8 answers

How good is the hook?

Details: 
Is the hook good enough to handle braided line in heavy cover without bending?
2 years, 4 months ago
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 - Hortonville
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A: 
Hooks are strong and sharp. I use 30# Invisibraid and have not had any problems with hookups or hooks breaking.
1 year, 3 months ago
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A: 
Pretty well, but if you want to fish heavy cover with a swim jig, try the hack attack jig or the heavy cover kvd swim jig. I preffer fishing this one over structure and sometimes in open water. I will sometimes use this around or in some cover with flourocarbon or monofilament. Haven't tried braid yet for this lure, but I absolutely love this lure.
1 year, 5 months ago
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A: 
No absolutely not
1 year, 5 months ago
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A: 
I use the 3/8 and .5 ounce models only. I can't imagine any bass on the planet bending these hooks straight. I did snag log this summer using 20 pound braid. I pulled for a few minutes and was about cut my losses. Suddenly, the jig popped, the hook was bent. I was putting some serious muscle into it.
2 years ago
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A: 
the heavy cover jig has the perfect hook for this
2 years, 3 months ago
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 - streamwood IL
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A: 
I would say it's a lighter wire hook but it is strong. So far I've been throwing mine on mono. I would think with a lighter tip rod (eg. Medium Heavy) you should be fine with braid.
2 years, 4 months ago
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 - Long Island, NY
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A: 
Definitely. Sturdy, durable, dependable hook.
2 years, 4 months ago
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 - San Diego, CA
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A: 
No, this is my go to jig for spinning gear.
2 years, 4 months ago
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2 years, 10 months ago
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A: 
Typically darker colours like blue and black are best for murky water.
1 month ago
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 - Ontario, Canada
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A: 
Chartreuse Sexy Shad, Sexy Shad, or Blue Shad will work best. Use brighter colors in murky waters.
1 year, 3 months ago
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A: 
Remember, bass in murky water don't just rely on their eyesight to catch prey, they use their nose and their lateral lines too. Going with the bluegill pattern is a great natural looking pattern that works very great in stained water and sometimes murky water. To allow the bass to see the jig better, try the chartreuse sexy shad pattern. The bass can see it, hear it, feel it, and if you add Yum f2, smell it. Good Luck!
1 year, 5 months ago
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A: 
I use black and blue
1 year, 5 months ago
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A: 
black and blue is agood choice also brite colors like red and chartruse white
2 years, 3 months ago
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 - streamwood IL
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A: 
I would say a black and blue should fit you just fine.
2 years, 4 months ago
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 - Long Island, NY
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A: 
I will use the bluegill color with a Green Pumpkin Zipper Spider Grub in Stained water to 6"-12". Keep in mind that this has rattles on it and the subtle rise and fall of the jig will make enough noise to get some attraction. If the water is really stained/ muddy then i will go with a Black/Blue color swim jig and match the trailer.
2 years, 7 months ago
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 - Maryland, Upper Bay
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A: 
I fish several types of stained water, but before I make a choice on color I like to do a test. I take three color patterns I am considering and pitch them away from my boat about three feet. I count how long a color is visible. I also use the "rock" method. If I am in an area with any rocks that could have crawfish I will target browns and oranges. Think like a crawfish and try to blend your bait in the conditions. One other thing to consider is some murky water at the surface is only murky because of boat or wind chop. May not be the case down deep.
2 years, 9 months ago
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 - Graham, NC
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What colors should i use for early spring and summer time in Massachusetts?
3 years, 7 months ago
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 - South Hadley, MA
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A: 
Can't speak for everyone, but any of the crayfish colors work great, especially in early spring. Texas Craw, or Green Pumpkin. I'm assuming that you are fishing pretty clear waters in Mass.
1 year, 3 months ago
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A: 
I love fishing this jig in spring and summer. I fish in lakes where the bass are constantly feeding on bluegill, so of course they will be tricked by this lure. In the summer time, bass will be chasing these bait fish in the mornings and evenings. Sometimes I will also pull out some decent bass in the middle of the day because of how great this lure is.
1 year, 5 months ago
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A: 
depends on what kind of bait fish or craw the bass arefeeding on bluegill pattern is allways a good start
2 years, 3 months ago
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 - streamwood IL
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A: 
I only use the bluegill color if the water is clear. Serious bait.
2 years, 4 months ago
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A: 
blue gill color works with a KVD watermelon (w/ black & red speckle)game hawg trailer works nice
3 years, 2 months ago
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 - north attleboro, mass
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A: 
Match the waters forage. Orange crawfish, go browns. Lots of panfish, go greens. Silver shiners, use whites.
3 years, 2 months ago
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 - NE Wisconsin
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A: 
Black /Blue with a blue chigger craw trailer
3 years, 5 months ago
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A: 
my go 2 type are bluegill,smoky shad, sexy shad this should help you get some good bass in spring all the way to fall
3 years, 6 months ago
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 - springfiled,OR
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3 years, 10 months ago
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A: 
I believe they are 3/0 and 4/0 respectively.
1 year, 3 months ago
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A: 
I think its a 4/0 on both.
2 years, 4 months ago
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A: 
Looks like a 1/0 or 2/0 hook.
3 years, 8 months ago
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 - Franklin, MA
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A: 
I believe a #4 is on the 3/8 and a #5 is on the half.
3 years, 10 months ago
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 - Clark County, Indiana
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I fish the Susquehanna a lot and also the tributaries during pre-spawn, post-spawn, and summer months.
4 years, 1 month ago
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 - Harrisburg PA
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A: 
I like the 3/8oz. in white with a white trailer.
1 year, 3 months ago
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A: 
I use pumpkin or dark green in 1/4 ounce with a hopping retrieve
1 year, 5 months ago
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A: 
Black and Blue in early spring - then I switch to blue gill color. Always use with a chompers twin trailer.
3 years, 10 months ago
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A: 
You'll want to fish the lightest weight that you can get away with so that the jig's action is natural. Weight used will depend upon the depth of water and the speed of current. Relative to color, my favorite color is bluegill but that is the natural forage where I fish. You will want to pick natural colors for clear water and brighter colors for stained to muddy water.
3 years, 11 months ago
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 - Minnesota
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4 years, 1 month ago
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 - swainsboro, GA
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A: 
I guess that depends a lot where you live. In North Carolina I used to use a 7" Culprit "crawdad" worm or a manns jelly worm, and did well. up here in Michigan, on the Detroit river or lake St. Clair, it is a tube or a 7" "pumpkinseed" Berkley power worm.
1 year, 1 month ago
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 - Suburban Detroit,Michigan
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A: 
These Swim Baits or Spinner Baits work great. Also salted worms such as the Yamamoto Senkos in Watermelon Magic, Firetiger, and Baby Bass colors work great too if you're fishing stained or murky waters.
I would stick to the bright colors for everything.
1 year, 3 months ago
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A: 
Bass in early fall will start going back into creek channels feeding on shad, so the smokey shad pattern in the back of the mouth of a creek should work very well!
1 year, 5 months ago
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A: 
spook is agood choice buzz bait strike kings rage tale shad top water is agood bet.
2 years, 3 months ago
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 - streamwood IL
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A: 
No #1 but start out with buzz 1/4 bait white
4 years ago
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 - Guntersville,Al
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A: 
In fall Bass are keying on shad, so I like a 1/4-3/8 oz. spinbait as fish come into the shallows. Strike King has some good offerings, but I really like the War Eagle in Hot Mouse.

If you like throwing soft plastic, try Strike King's Caffine Shad, or Reaction Innovations Dipper, or a Swim Senko. Any of these will work well all through the fall.
4 years, 1 month ago
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 - Champaign, Ill.
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Q: 
11 answers

how do you work this lure?

4 years, 6 months ago
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A: 
Pretty much like a spinnerbait, except in short, 5" or 6" retrieves. Pull about 6" of line in and then take up the slack. Keep repeating that action. When a bass hits, they will either slam it, or you will feel a lose of feel of the bait. Then slam a hook set.
1 year, 3 months ago
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A: 
slow retrieve just tick the weeds. alittle pumping motion now then
2 years, 3 months ago
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 - streamwood IL
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A: 
put a craw trailer on it and jig it every 3-5 seconds so that it almost hits the bottom.
3 years, 8 months ago
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 - Massachusetts
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A: 
I usually cast it out, let it sink to the bottom, and then slowly wind it in. When most bass hit it it will just bite it not inhale it, and thats when you set the hook.
4 years, 2 months ago
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A: 
Steady slow retrieve.
4 years, 3 months ago
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A: 
LIKE A SLOW CRANK BAIT
4 years, 3 months ago
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 - gAINESVILLE vIRGINIA
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A: 
For the swim jig, you can steady reel it to boat or shore, or lift and drop along the way, or try some of both until the fish tell you what they want for that day.

Flippin' is another way to fish it if you come across heavy cover. Just drop into cover and work up and down.
4 years, 3 months ago
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 - Champaign, Ill.
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A: 
Slow steady retrieve just above or barely hitting the grass. If it hits grass pull it out quickly.
4 years, 4 months ago
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A: 
I jig is like a normal jig... and i also retrieve it like a spinner bait. A nice slow retreive works great.
4 years, 5 months ago
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 - Clark County, Indiana
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A: 
Okay...just my take on things. By title it's a Swim Jig. So, although you can apply slower, more methodical presentations it's was designed to be swam. I first used the KVD Swim Jig this year during pre-spawn on a little creek that connects one of the local reservoirs to the Sacramento River. I was focusing on a crawfish pattern working on a reaction bite. And I was casting to cover, as opposed to Flipp'n and Pitch'n. This is important b/c if you were doing the Flipp'n/Pitch'n deal you would need to manage your slack line right away. Why, b/c when you're casting it often times disturbs the immediate environment when it splashes (less chance for a fish to hit on the fall). If you use those other techniques your presentation does not disturb the environment so the fish will just think the "food" just jumped in the water or fell off a tree branch and be aggressive with it. Anyway, I would cast it out and let it settle. While I watched the rings from the splash slowly dissipate away I would take a breath and think about the rhythm or cadence of the presentation. It's basically the same thing you would do to work a jerk bait. After it settles I would "bring it to life" by reeling and (slowly) shaking my rod tip. Then I would make a larger movement by snapping my rod tip upward and making the jig rise up off the bottom and dance (ie as if it was surprised by a predator). Then I would "crawl 'n shake" again, then "burn" the bait back several feet as if it was trying to get away from something - thus causing a predatory response from the bass. Then stop and do the whole process over. As for finding the best speed/rhythm/cadence, start with a "rhythm" that you think will work given the conditions. If you're pretty sure there are fish in your location all you have to do is speed it up or slow your presentation down until you starting getting "bit!" Remember, resist locking yourself into a speed, rhythm and/or cadence. This was a personal challenge for me!!! You'll go away from your favorite spot saying, "I guess they weren't hitting today!" But as the saying goes, '...always let the fish tell you how they want your lure." That's why...if you're not getting bit change your speed. And always imagine a bass is "on-your-lure" while you're working your presentation. Convince yourself that just one more movement might trigger a strike. And if you're having trouble "seeing" all this think of it as if you had a piece of yarn and you're teasing a cat to pounce on it. If you think of that as a general reference model you'll catch more fish and you'll add a deadly technique to your fishing arsenal!!!
NOW GO GET BIT!!! "/----<>( }*<>(=
*In light of the Gulf catastrophe please be a responsible angler. We need to protect the fish and their environment.
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4 years, 5 months ago
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A: 
Think of a spinnerbait without blades! It's great in heavy cover and in calm clear water conditions. Its good fished over grass and millfoil. It is a more subtle presentation than most other search baits. You can also fish it like a regular jig on the bottom if you come across a laydown or a rock pile. I always add either a grub (deeper) or a net bait paca chunk (shallower) as a trailer. Cast it out and try different retrieves. Burn it, jig it radically or slow roll it through deep structure. I fish it on 12-17lb flourocarbon line on a 7' Medium Heavy rod.
4 years, 5 months ago
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 - Minnesota
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Q: 
11 answers

What size to use

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i am fairly new to bass. i live on the california delta. what size do you recomend for this jig and why? thanks
5 years, 5 months ago
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A: 
i have fished the delta with this jig and i use all sizes and got fish but the heavy cover and the biggest one got me my limit in the first 5 casts out of all the fish it was 46lbs 12oz
3 years, 6 months ago
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 - springfiled,OR
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A: 
3/8 oz Allways use the smallest size you can get by with under you'r conditions
4 years ago
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 - Guntersville,Al
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A: 
I USE 3/8 & 1/4
4 years, 3 months ago
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 - gAINESVILLE vIRGINIA
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A: 
That depends on whether you plan to swim or flip this jig and the heaviness of your rod (med, mh, or heavy, for example). The jig comes in two models (swim or heavy cover).

For heavier tackle (rod and line) and flippin', use a heavier jig, at least 3/8oz. For swimming the jig, 1/4 or 3/8oz. may be enough.

In clear water, use a natural color, blue or smoky shad, grn pumpkin, or black blue. Stained water, black still good, but a little chartruese helps.
4 years, 3 months ago
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 - Champaign, Ill.
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A: 
The standard weight for swim jigs is 1/4 oz but any of these sizes will work. You really don't get much of a difference in depth when you work them like they are supposed to be worked. If you want the lure to run deeper than 3ft use as heavy of a jig as you can reel slower.
4 years, 5 months ago
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A: 
I use all three. Depending upon the depth, structure or grass and weather conditions. I always try to throw the lightest one that I can get away with. Pick the color that best matches the forage in your area and purchase all three sizes. Add a grub or paca chunk trailer in a matching color to increase the profile of the bait and hold on!
4 years, 5 months ago
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 - Minnesota
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A: 
My impression of the Delta is that it is somewhat like the Potomac river where I fish in that it is relatively shallow. I use the 3/8 oz. model--if I were fishing deeper water I might consider the 1/2 oz. You can vary the fall rate by increasing the size of the trailer (I use a Gambler Lil Otter most of the time) to slow it down. The 1/4oz may be good for clear water, but since I see little of that I've never bought one, and probably won't.
4 years, 6 months ago
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 - Virginia/Potomac River
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A: 
3/8 oz black/blue with a black and blue tube. I sinks slower than a heavier jig and bass can't resist it.
4 years, 7 months ago
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 - East Arkansas
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A: 
Mike, this is a great jig for the delta or clear lake. You have to add a trailer for added action. It works well against tulle edges and in the smokey shad color could represent the NOCAL Hitch a common food source for bass. Run this jig and trailer along the edge of the grass and hang on tight. I prefer the smaller too sizes (1/4 and 3/8) in the spring and early summer and the larger size as the shad grow late in the summer. Keep your trailer color similar to that of your jig but choose something with action like a curl tail or split tail.
4 years, 8 months ago
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 - Mc Leansville, NC
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A: 
Go for a 1/4 oz jig to start, you won't get any bass smaller then 1 lb with it, if you are trying to get some big boys use a trailer. Swim it or Jump it and reel.
4 years, 9 months ago
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A: 
I recommend using the 3/8 oz. with a Berkley chiggercraw trailer. Try to match colors to what is the natural forage in the body of water you are fishing. If it is crayfish go with the greens and Texas craw. If it is shad go with the whites and bluegill color if there are a lot of sunfish in the area. Always use are trailer and be aware most hits on a jig occur on the lure falling.
5 years, 4 months ago
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 - Frankin, MA
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Which color is the best all around for this jig? I know that the darker the water, the darker the jig and the lighter the water, the more natural the color, but I am only 16 and do not have a boat and live 1.5 hours away from the lake, so I have no idea what the water looks like. Therefore, I am looking for a good all around color.
5 years, 7 months ago
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 - Pennsylvania
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A: 
bluegill and black an blue tiped with rage tale craw
2 years, 3 months ago
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 - streamwood IL
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A: 
Black/Blue blue trailer
4 years ago
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 - Guntersville,Al
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A: 
Black and Blue will catch most of the time.
4 years, 3 months ago
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A: 
IF THE LAKE HAS BLUEGILL I WOULD
USE THAT COLOR
4 years, 3 months ago
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 - gAINESVILLE vIRGINIA
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A: 
Looks like it has been awhile since you asked this question and you may already have your answer, but for those new to Bass fishing, good all round colors are black blue or bluegill as offered for this jig whether water is clear or stained.

Normally, grn pumpkin is a good solid color too, if more of a dark olive shade.
4 years, 3 months ago
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 - Champaign, Ill.
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A: 
The gold standard color for a swim jig is black blue with a blue (like junebug) 5" single tail grub.

In areas that have shad, white is dynamite.

I tend to use Texas Craw, Bluegill or Green Pumpkin in the natural lakes of Minnesota.
4 years, 5 months ago
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A: 
i have one is sexy shad... one in white and blue,... and black and blue... black and blue is by far my best jig color regardless
4 years, 5 months ago
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 - Clark County, Indiana
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A: 
Color depends on the forage in your area. My #1 color is the Bluegill, #2 is smokey joe because we don't have much shad in this part of the country like they do in the south and east. Sexy Shad would probably be a good #3 pick.
4 years, 5 months ago
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 - Minnesota
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A: 
The green and bluegill colors have really been an excellent choice for me. I usually put a trailer on the jig and the color of the trailer can match the water clarity. Green is always a great bass color.
4 years, 6 months ago
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 - Columbus, Ohio
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A: 
I would suggest anything in a "natrual" color. That means use mostly green pumkin or brown. Think of the color of natrual objects you see in the water. The colors I use are 08,34, and 46. This will give you an all around color selection. Stick with green pumkin for you trailer with any of these colors. Use 3/8 for size which is heavy enough to cast but not too heavy to work quickly as water warms.
4 years, 8 months ago
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 - Mc Leansville, NC
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A: 
I used this jig this summer and found that the I caught the most fish with was the Bluegill color. I also caught fish on the Green/Pumkkin color. I used the Bluegill in stained water, and at dusk, and used the Green/Punkin in clear water. You may aslo want to ckeck out the Bass Pro Shops Enticer Pro series Moonsoor Swim Jig. It is also a swim jig that catches bass.
5 years, 7 months ago
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5 years, 10 months ago
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A: 
USE ONE THAT IS RECOMMENDED
BY STRIKE KING
4 years, 3 months ago
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 - gAINESVILLE vIRGINIA
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A: 
I always like to use a trailer. To imitate a shad, I like a curly tail grub; Berkley Powergrubs are one choice which also add scent for extra appeal and holding time.

For more of a craw look and for good balance and a slower vertical drop, use something like a craw, or a chunk which has claws.
4 years, 3 months ago
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 - Champaign, Ill.
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A: 
A single tail grub is a must. 5" is the standard size. Use kalins, Zoom or Yamamoto's grub with this lure.
4 years, 5 months ago
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A: 
I always add a grub for deeper presentations and a net bait paca chunk for shallower presentations. I never fish it with out a trailer!
4 years, 5 months ago
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 - Minnesota
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A: 
Definitely add a trailer, I use the Gambler Lil Otter, but there are any number of choices. For this particular bait I would choose something in the 3-4 inch range.
4 years, 6 months ago
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 - Virginia/Potomac River
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A: 
always add a trailer, a tube works great with it. Around here we call it a jig and a pig or a jig and a gisset.
4 years, 7 months ago
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 - East Arkansas
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A: 
The jig is small in profile and by adding a trailer you can add more action. I only fish it without when I am fishing it slow and the food source is very small shad or fry. I prefer a curl tail trailer for more action and greater water displacement.
4 years, 8 months ago
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 - Mc Leansville, NC
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A: 
I have had better luck w/ a trailer. I use Reaction Innovations Smallie Beaver on a 3/8 oz. KVD swim jig. I dont have all the possible color combo's or have room for that matter since I mostly float tube fish. However, I have found that sticking w/ the green/watermelon seed/blues seem to work well.
5 years, 3 months ago
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 - mid-missouri
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A: 
Unless you're in a super clear water situation where the fish might want a smaller profile and more subtle presentation, I'd always use some kind of trailer. The best kind depends on several factors such as water clarity, depth fished, desired fall rate and of course, the forage. If you're fishing deep and need to get the bait down quickly, a heavier jig with a chunk-style trailer works well. For shallow water applications, either a single tail or twin tail curly grub works great. If the water is clear, use the single tail. If the water is darker, try the double tail or even a four inch swimbait like the Strike King Shadalicious added to the jig. Dyeing the tips of the tail chartreuse can also help trigger more strikes.
5 years, 6 months ago
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A: 
I always use a matching jig trailer with this jig, and most others. I do it for three reasons. One, because it helps the jig fall at the right speed. Also, a trailer gives off more viberation, and action. The last reason is that it gives the jig a profile that looks more like a crawfish. I like the Zoom Super Chunk trailer.
5 years, 8 months ago
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A: 
I have found the jig works very well as is. When I added a tail I found I was getting hung up a little more often but you should do what your gut tells you.
5 years, 10 months ago
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