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Remington® UMC Handgun Ammo

   

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Cartridge or Gauge Grain Other specs Quantity Price & availability

.38 Special

130 Grain

Velocity (fps):
790

Bullet Type:
Metal Case

Quantity:
50 rounds
  • $21.49

  • SKU: 192364

  • In Stock
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.40 Smith & Wesson

180 Grain

Velocity (fps):
990

Bullet Type:
Metal Case

Quantity:
50 rounds
  • $21.49

  • SKU: 203646

  • In Stock
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.25 ACP

50 Grain

Velocity (fps):
760

Bullet Type:
Metal Case

Quantity:
50 rounds
  • $22.99

  • SKU: 284903

  • In Stock
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.38 Special

158 Grain

Velocity (fps):
755

Bullet Type:
Round Nose

Quantity:
50 rounds
  • $20.49

  • SKU: 284907

  • In Stock
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.45 Automatic Colt Pistol

230 Grain

Velocity (fps):
835

Bullet Type:
Metal Case

Quantity:
50 rounds
  • $25.99

  • SKU: 284908

  • In Stock
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.32 ACP

71 Grain

Velocity (fps):
905

Bullet Type:
Metal Case

Quantity:
50 rounds
  • $26.99

  • SKU: 455373

  • In Stock
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10mm

180 Grain

Velocity (fps):
1150

Bullet Type:
Metal Case

Quantity:
50 rounds
  • $33.99

  • SKU: 455378

  • In Stock
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.40 Smith & Wesson

165 Grain

Velocity (fps):
1150

Bullet Type:
Metal Case

Quantity:
50 rounds
  • $21.49

  • SKU: 534137

  • In Stock
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For practice, target shooting, training exercises or any other high-volume shooting situation UMC centerfire pistol and revolver ammunition offers value without any compromise in quality or performance. Made with Remington components right here in the USA, UMC handgun ammunition is available in today's most popular pistol and revolver calibers with metal case bullets. UMC ammunition provides shooters with the optimum blend of value and performance. An economical value for the discriminating shooter. Dependable quality at an affordable price.  50 rounds/box.
Remington® UMC Handgun Ammo 4.6 5 52 52
awesome accurate shell very clean shooting and never a jam. very accurate for a 85 ft distance . dependable for a sure shot. will buy more when I can. thanks Bass Pro shop November 27, 2013
Good Ammo Good ammo! Very consistent groups. I would definitely buy this ammo again. October 21, 2013
They are 44 rounds what can I say Haven't shot the 44 in while it was great. It is an awesome weapon to have and shoot. Thanks BassPro for having the ammo on hand. September 15, 2013
Quality Bass Pro...Outstanding customer service. I purchased Remington LRN. 38spl. at a great price, compared to all other on-line sellers of ammo jacking up prices and ripping you off. I will be a steady customer. June 21, 2013
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13 Questions | 56 Answers

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4 years, 8 months ago
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A: 
Love the 180 grain ammo and it gives good performance on deer Its easy to control which will give better groups. ive used it in my mod 29 s& w since 1978 It works !!
1 year, 8 months ago
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 - maryland
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A: 
Remington or Federal
2 years ago
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 - Milton, FL
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A: 
Depends on the use of the ammo and whether it is for hunting, plinking or self protection. For hunting, a high velocity expandable bullet; for plinking, cheap ammo with brass case (coated steel cases are hard to eject when the pistol gets hot), and for self protection, low velocity expandable bullet.
3 years, 10 months ago
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 - Cashiers, NC
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A: 
I like Remington jacketed soft point
3 years, 11 months ago
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 - Gainesville FL
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A: 
It depends on what you want to use the ammo for. If you are simply shooting at the range for target practice, I would recommend any American made FMJ brass cased ammunition (like Remington UMC). If you are buying ammo for self/home defense, I recommend Remington Golden Sabers or Federal HydroShock HPs. Hollow points are much more effective for defense and safer to use in a house hold (they expand quickly and will slow down in walls, hopefully causing less unwanted damage/injuries.
4 years, 2 months ago
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A: 
You should be able to use any over the counter .44 Mag ammo. The different loads and bullet weights depend on what you use it for.
The bigger the game the bigger the bullet. My favorite was the 180 grain jacketed hollow point using H-110 powder. I started out with light loads and worked my way up until I found the most accurate load for my particular gun.
4 years, 3 months ago
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 - Sunset Harbor, NC
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4 years, 9 months ago
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A: 
If you have any questions on what ammunition your pistol will fire check with a gun smith or contact the manufacturer.

Normally the caliber is stamped in the barrel and can be found on the ammunition box. Match the two up and you should have a winner.
3 years, 11 months ago
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 - Cincinnati, Ohio
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yes
4 years ago
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 - Panama city fl
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4 years, 10 months ago
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A: 
yes they are and I have no problems with them in my 25 auto and not a jam yet. very accurate also
11 months ago
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A: 
I shoot them in my 25 auto without any problems.

Hope that answers you question.
3 years, 11 months ago
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 - Cincinnati, Ohio
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A: 
Some small .25 autos will have feed problems with soft-nosed bullets. As the slide comes forward stripping a fresh round out of the mag, the lead nose is pushed up the feed ramp into battery. This soft tip requires more force due to increased friction created b/w the 2 surfaces.

Moreover, you will get a steady deposit of lead on the feed ramp which adds to the problem b/c now your pushing a soft lead tip against a lead coated feed ramp.

If you shoot 50 rounds b/w cleanings, you'll be fine, but close to the end of a 100 ct. box, you'll see that the slide doesn't always go fully into battery.
4 years ago
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4 years, 11 months ago
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A: 
For home defense - A Taurus 45/410 short barrel
3 years, 11 months ago
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 - Gainesville FL
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Beretta 32 Auto
4 years ago
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 - Panama city fl
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A: 
Many guys recommend small frame revolvers for women. They claim that many women are afraid of getting their hand pinched by the slide, they lack the upper body strength to rack the slide on some pistols, and that revolvers are more simple to operate.

I say this is all sexist nonsense and downright WRONG! Women are smart enough to operate either, and both the fear of getting slide-pinched and the idea that women cannot rack the slide on a semi-aute are as simple as learning proper technique. More importantly, small frame revolvers have a stiff double action trigger that is HARD to master even for experienced shooters and they are so small that recoil feels exaggerated. I'd say these snub nosed revolvers are the hardest guns to learn with and will likely turn you against shooting.

I'd recommend a reliable striker-fired semi-auto (hammers get snagged on things inside pockets and purses). Also, polymner frames are lighter than steel or alloy. Some choices, like a Glock, leave you with FAR more choices of accessories (lasers, replacement grips, holsters, extra magazines, etc.).

All that being said, I would not presume to choose a handgun for my wife. After discussing minimum calibers for self-defense, capacity, concealability, and QUALITY she went out and held several guns and chose what felt most comfortable to her. She chose a Bersa Thunder .380 for it's reliability, concealability, accuracy and low recoil. Today's self-dense ammo makes .380 a smarter choice than it used to be, but I still wish she had gotten a 9mm or larger.

Whatever you choose, train with it weekly for a month or more. Learn to clear malfunctions and dry-fire it daily to learn the feel of the trigger and get used to racking the slide properly. Rememeber your skill at shooting is very perishable, so don't go months without a trip to the range.
4 years ago
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A: 
Several questions need to be answered before that question can properly be answered. Most importantly, how experienced is the she (or any individual for that matter, regardless of male/female) with guns? What kind of guns has she shot before? What is she comfortable with (big question)? I take this question very seriously because I have a girlfriend that grew up around guns and is comfortable with them, however, she had never shot a pistol. I bought her a pistol that she now legally carries. It is of the utmost importance that no matter what you get her, encourage this person to go to the range with you and practice with this weapon before she carries it, not only for her safety, but also the safety of others around her. Now that I got the safety talk out of the way, I strongly recommend a S&W Airweight .38 spl or the Ruger LCR .38 spl. You can not go wrong with a .38 spl revolver for someone that is less than experienced with pistols (no clip to wear out, no slide to pull back, and more stopping power). If that seems to heavy or hard to conceal, then I recommend a Ruger LCP or Taurus TCP (even comes in pink), but I warn you that these small pocket .380 autos are fickle and need to be broken in. Also, be sure that she is comfortable with the mechanics of the pistol (lots of range time). If you are just getting her someone to shoot at the range with you and not to carry for protection, then I suggest a Sig Sauer Miskito.
4 years, 2 months ago
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A: 
I cannot answer that question. All you can do is get as much information as you can (users, gun shows, gun shops, online forums, etc.) and then go buy. Here are some questions to consider:
1. How much money do you plan on spending to shoot; $20 for 500 rounds or $40 for 20 rounds? Shooting can get expensive. If you do not shoot, you will not train, and if you do not train, you will be dangerous when you "actually need it."
2. Do you plan on concealed carrying this gun?
3. Is this a self-defense gun or just a gun to go shoot?
4. Do you think you would prefer a revolver or pistol?
I know these are just a few of the many questions you could ask, but it should start the decision making. Good luck, and have fun.
4 years, 4 months ago
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 - Clovis, New Mexico
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A: 
My wife recently purchased the Taurus PT24/7 compact model in 9mm.
She loves it. She has pretty small hands (as do most women) so this gun is just right for her. A buddy of mine bought his wife the Khar 9mm. The Kahr is slightly slimmer than the Taurus but both are great pistols. Out of 300+ rounds in the Taurus not a single problem using multiple brands of ammo.
4 years, 11 months ago
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4 years, 11 months ago
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A: 
The .357SIG pistol cartridge is the product of Swiss German firearms manufacturer Sig-Sauer , in coop with Federal Ammo It's based on a .40 S&W case necked down to accept .355-inch bullets, the .357SIG brass is a little bit longer. Hope this helps
1 year, 6 months ago
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 - Central FL
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A: 
If you are referring to a .357 SIG, it means Sig Sauer, the original manufacturer of the round.
3 years, 9 months ago
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 - Tiverton, RI
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The .357 Sig round was created by Federal in 1994 for Sig-Sauer. Sig wanted a semi-auto round that would compete with the .357 magnum. Federal accomplished this by using necked-down .40 S&W brass and a 9mm bullet. This allowed the much shorter .357 Sig round to function well in a semi-auto pistol while producing the punch that the much longer .357 mag is famous for.

The .357 Sig will fit in magazines designed for .40 S&W pistols, but should never be fired from that platform. Since the brass is .40 caliber, the .357 Sig will NOT fit into a .357/.38 revolver.
4 years ago
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A: 
I assume you are referring to the .357 sig round. The .357 SIG is referring to the fact that Sig developed that round in the same manner that Smith and Wesson developed the .40 S&W. The .357 Sig round is Sig Sauer's attempt to recreate the .357 Magnum round in an automatic pistol format. It is essentially the casing of a .40 S&W necked own to accommodate a 9mm size bullet (higher pressure behind a smaller bullet). To more directly answer your question though, it means that Sig Sauer created the round. And if you were wondering, no the .357 sig is not interchangeable with .357 magnum and vice versa.
4 years, 2 months ago
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A: 
It is ammunition developed and designed for a Sig Sauer pistol. Now other manufacturers use it.
4 years, 5 months ago
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A: 
SIG is just the company that created the caliber. Just like Remington, Winchester, Marlin, Hornady and so on.
4 years, 11 months ago
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5 years, 2 months ago
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A: 
Same caliber but 380 has shorter cartridge. Less stopping power.
3 years, 11 months ago
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 - Gainesville FL
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A: 
They are the same.

The .380 ACP goes by many names including:
.380 Auto
.380 Short,
9mm Browning,
9mm Browning Short
9mm Corto
9mm Court
9mm Kurz
9mm Kratak
9mm Scurt
4 years ago
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A: 
Most of the time, when people say 9mm short, they are referring to the .380 automatic round which is actually 9mmx17mm. However, beware that sometimes people that don't really know what they are talking about are referring to the 9mm Makarov which is actually 9mmx18mm and not compatible with the traditional 9mm (9mmx19mm) or .380 auto. If you own a .380 auto, make sure the ammo you are buying either says .380 auto or 9mmx17mm (in which case you will probably be buying foreign ammo and I don't recommend doing that).
4 years, 2 months ago
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A: 
A .380 is a 9mm short........same bullet, just a little shorter case.
4 years, 3 months ago
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 - Sunset Harbor, NC
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A: 
Designed by John Browning and added to the Colt Pocket Automatic Line as the 380 ACP in 1908. Introduced in Europe by FN in 1912 as the 9mm Browning Short, also known in Italy as the 9mm Corto and in Germany as the 9mm Kurz. AKA 9X17mm.

They are all the same.
5 years, 1 month ago
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A: 
2mm. .380 is a 9mm round with a 17mm casing. A full size 9mm round has a 19mm casing.
5 years, 1 month ago
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Q: 
6 answers

are the MC ammo lead??

Details: 
I own a glock 40cal and cannot shoot lead ammo, if it only says metal cased, how can I be sure it is jacketed?? or what ever kind of bullet it is?? thanks
5 years, 4 months ago
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 - rhode island
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A: 
MC means metallic casing. It is basically the same as FMJ., Full Metal Jacket.
3 years, 9 months ago
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 - Tiverton, RI
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A: 
Target ammo will have the abbreviation FMJ or TMJ on the box or it will be spelled out Full Metal Jacket or Total Metal Jacket.

Self-defense ammo will say JHP for Jacketed Hollow Point.

You just want to avoid any ammo that says soft-tip, soft-nose, lead nosed, or JSP (Jacketed Soft Point). A few foreign manufacturers use the term LRN and LFN for Lead Round Nose and Lead Flat Nose. You need to avoid them too.
4 years ago
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A: 
The box of ammo will have a printed description. If it is lead it should say so. Jacketed bullets may have lead inside of them but the important thing is the "jacketed" bullet does not foul your barrel like shooting lead does. If it says JHP on the box, it contains Jacketed Hollow Points.
4 years, 3 months ago
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 - Sunset Harbor, NC
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A: 
MC means metal cased (the casing not the bullet itself) meaning not brass, has nothing to do with bullet.
4 years, 11 months ago
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A: 
For your Glock you might want to order an after market barrel if you want to shoot lead. Lone Wolf sells Glock barrels that are OK to shoot lead. About a 100 bucks. Loads of stuff for Glock at the site.
5 years, 3 months ago
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A: 
Usually yes, MC only means metal coated, but should still shoot OK in your pistol as the manufacturer means no lead exposed to the bore.
If you shoot only non-lead bullets, you're stuck with either no lead frangible, or pure copper, which are quite expensive & not necessary.
5 years, 3 months ago
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 - Thousand Oaks, CA.
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Q: 
3 answers

.32 S&W vs .32 ACP

Details: 
What is the difference and can they both be used in a Walther PPK/S .32 ?
5 years, 4 months ago
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A: 
No, .32 s&w is for revolvers, ACP is for semi-auto
1 year ago
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 - Portage,in
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No. The designation acp stands for automatic pistol. The .32 acp will function in your PPK/S.
4 years, 5 months ago
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A: 
.32 S & W is revolver ammo and will not work in your Walther.
.32 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol) is for use in an auto loading pistol.
5 years, 4 months ago
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 - Northern Virginia
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Q: 
5 answers

Is this brass cased ammo?

Details: 
This is an important detail for indoor ranges and reloaders. Info should appear in every product description.

Thanks....... J
5 years, 5 months ago
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 - Hilton Head, SC
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yes
1 year, 6 months ago
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A: 
This IS brass cased ammo. Few American ammo manufacturers use steel cases, but some, like CCI, use an aluminum case. It's usually easy enough to tell by the picture (brass has a distinct color). Sometimes it's harder to tell a steel case from an aluminum case from just a picture unless the steel ammo is lacquered (most Russian ammo has this), which makes it look dark almost brownish gray.

I agree that it wouldn't hur for them to say for sure in the description, but as a general rule, it's safe to assume ammo has brass cases unless otherwise specified. I've NEVER seen steel or aluminum cased ammo that doesn't say so clearly in the description and on the box.
4 years ago
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A: 
Yes, it is brass cased.
4 years, 2 months ago
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A: 
Yes it is.
4 years, 3 months ago
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 - Iowa Park,Tx
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A: 
Yes..brass. Not nickle
5 years, 4 months ago
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5 years, 5 months ago
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A: 
I would recommend using any American made FMJ brass cased ammo for practice. American made ammo is always cleaner and made at more exacting tolerances than most foreign (i.e.Wolf, Brown Bear, Barnaul, etc.) ammo. Stick with Remington FMJ, Winchester FMJ, and Federal FMJ if you can. Your gun will love you for it and you won't have to spend as much time cleaning it.
4 years, 2 months ago
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Top 500 Contributor
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A: 
I like the Remington/UMC 9mm ammo for practice. I have used it for years with only one or 2 duds in all that time.

It is a great value for the money. I buy it in the 250 round bulk packs when I can get my hands on them.

I shoot a GLOCK 26; so I cannot use lead ammo.
5 years, 5 months ago
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