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FN Herstal® FNX-40 Pistol

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Cartridge or Gauge
Finish
Stock Color
Other specs Quantity Price & availability

.40 Smith & Wesson

Black

Black

Barrel Length:
4"

Round Capacity:
14 + 1

Hand:
Ambidextrous

Gun Weight:
24.3 oz.
Made for long lasting, lightweight performance, the FN Herstal FNX-40 Pistol offers all of the features that dedicated handgunners want. Great for competition or personal defense, the FNX-40 features a rugged, ergonomic polymer frame that delivers a low bore axis for less felt recoil and improved control. Handle features checkered and ribbed grip panels for comfortable, no-snag carry and four interchangeable backstrap inserts to quickly adapt the FNX to your hand size. A 4" hammer-forged stainless steel barrel delivers pinpoint accuracy.  The profiled stainless steel slide has cocking serrations front and rear for easy operation. The FNX-40 also features an external extractor with loaded chamber indicator, ring-style external hammer, and MIL-STD 1913 accessory mounting rail. Fixed 3-dot combat sights with Deep-V rear notch for greater accuracy.
Rated 5 out of 5 by 1 reviewer.
Rated 5 out of 5 by FNX 40, Two Years ago and an Update. I moved this review from the FNP 40, which was the version prior to the FNX. It was really about the FNX, but the online catalog lagged somewhat, so it was under the FNP. It has also been some time since the review was first online, so I thought I would throw in some hindsight, since that always seems to be 20/20. The review came online July 2011. "This is my second FNH pistol. I reviewed the FNX 9 previously. This review will cover the FNX 40 as that is the current version. The FNX 40 is nearly identical to the 9. Put 'em side by side, it would be hard to say which was which, especially in black. Pick 'em up and you notice right away. The FNX 40 is a heavier gun. That helps with the punch that the bigger S&W 40 round packs. Shooting the 40 is not much different than the 9, thanks to that weight. The sights are what I would call standard three dot combat. Not too much different than the standard fair. The 40 is easy to point and hits what you point at. It breaks down easy, and is quite simple to clean. Puttin' 'er back together is a snap too. I am a fan of the design. John Moses Browning update. The ambidextrous controls are a boon for us southpaws. The grip texture is aggressive without being painful. Nice secure gripping to be sure, and once I changed the back strap to my preference it was even more user friendly. There has been some talk of no screw method of attaching the back strap lending itself to slippage. I have not noticed any affect. I have switched back and forth several times for my huge handed boys and suffered not a wit. I like the weight savings afforded in the polymer portion of the pistol. The FNX 40 is hammer fired. I like it. The gun is comfortable in my hand. The wife will shoot it, but she prefers the 9's over the 40. When we go out shootin' there is a fair bit of iron to choose from and people are drawn to the 40 and it gets a good work out. Never fails to feed or eject. My 75 year old father and my 73 year old father in law both shoot it more than the 9. I like that the FNX's are made in the US of A. For the bad... During fabrication of the polymer section excess material is milled out of the handle on the magazine guides. It left fuzz attached and took some scraping to get it out. There have been posts about it on the blogs. FNH it ain't pretty! It did not affect the pistol, but it is unsightly and better is expected for the money spent on a firearm of this class. Not all suffer from this, so check inside the handle for it before hand. I cleaned mine up pretty quick as I did not want to send it back and wait. A nuisance to be sure. Other than that no complaints. Again I am pleased with the pistol and with making my purchase through Bass Pro. I will be seeing you guys for the trifecta... A FNH FNP 45. Let's go shootin'!" UPDATE! I've put a bit and some change over two thousand rounds through this little bugger, and she has never skipped a beat. Granted there are some new pistols resting in the safe along side her (easy girl), and they too, want to strut their stuff at the range, but the FNX 40 still gets her share. The FNX may not be possessed of all the blather of some of the other names, but it is a solid performer, built by a premier weapons manufacturer. Shooting, with the Missus, family, and or friends at range is my "Ticket to Paradise". The FNX 40 makes it a good ride. There are no regrets in regards to this purchase. See ya at the range! July 6, 2013
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what is a .40?

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i've never heard of a .40 but i am very interested in buying this gun for my son please give me more details. Thanks
2 years ago
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A: 
Short story to answer your question, .40 is the vernacular for the S&W .40 semi auto round. Lore has it that the FBI went to a 10mm round, but SOME agents could not handle this high powered round so... A short powdered round was introduced based on a .40 caliber (10mm x 22mm), that was more than a 9mm and less than a full 10mm. It was designed as a Law Enforcement round.
It is quite potent.(but then a hit with a.22 is better than a miss with a .50BMG) Generally recognized as being harder hitting than a 9mm because of an energy advantage. When compared to the .45 ACP, the debate turns ugly, and can be saved for another day. Lots of first time buyers were buying them as 9mm got scarce. It is more expensive to shoot than a 9, but not excessive. Ammo is a "Common" size, not weird.
1 year, 2 months ago
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 - Outside Chicago
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A: 
A 40 caliber round is a .400 diamter bullet. It was orignally made by the Norma company in the 70's as a 10mm. Think of a 10mm as a 357 mag and a 40 as a 38 special.

The 10mm used a heavier and larger frame. The FBI petitioned Smith and Wesson to build a round with same diamter of bullet but in a shorter round that could be handled by smaller framed men and women. Hince the 40 S&W was made.

The 40 caliber round is the #1 round carried by Law Enforcement around the USA. It packs a good punch, has very managable recoil and low penatration.
2 years ago
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A: 
40 S&W is a shorter, drawn down version of the 10 mm with ballistics similar to a 45 automatic.
2 years ago
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 - Oklahoma City, OK
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2 years, 8 months ago
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A: 
Mine came with 3 magazines, cable lock, instructions, keep the kids safe pamphlet, spent casing, and back straps.
1 year, 2 months ago
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 - Outside Chicago
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3 mags, Lockable hard case, additional backstraps and locking device
2 years, 3 months ago
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A: 
3 mags total. Hard case included
2 years, 3 months ago
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