Caviness Painted Boat Oars

   

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Size
Description
Quantity Price & availability

5-1/2'

Wood

  • $30.99

  • SKU: 580136

  • In Stock
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6'

Wood

  • $36.99

  • SKU: 580138

  • In Stock
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6-1/2'

Wood

  • $39.99

  • SKU: 580140

  • In Stock
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7'

Wood

  • $42.99

  • SKU: 580147

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A first-class combination of lightweight materials and strength in a Caviness® painted wood oar. Economically priced. 1 piece each.

  • Lightweight but strong
  • Painted wood construction  
Caviness Painted Boat Oars 3.4 5 5 5
Not like the oars you remember Cheap looking. Paint can be scraped with a fingernail. If you're looking for cheap oars, these are for you. Just don't expect too much for the money. October 5, 2010
Broken oar I used these oars only three times. The third time one of the oars broke. Talking about stuck up the river! September 8, 2009
Amazing oars These are great oars they are super light though very durable they are easy to use the only down side is the paint comes off around the oarlocks May 21, 2008
Great Buy Very well made for the price. Rounded handles are easy on even the smallest hands and the sturdy construction allows for a great deal of abuse when teaching young people how to row. July 22, 2007
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5 years, 7 months ago
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Staff Answer
A: 
Look for Oar Locks with less then 2" shaft diameter.

This item has a Shaft Dimensions: 1 3/8”.
3 years, 4 months ago
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 - springfield, mo
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6 years, 4 months ago
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Best Answer
A: 
I have six foot oars for a 12' boat and they work fine.

I was told a "rule of thumb" that the oars should be half the length of the boat.
4 years, 1 month ago
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A: 
the standard way to calculate proper oar size depends on the span between the oarlocks, rather than length. here's how it goes:
measure the distance between the oarlocks. divide by 2, then add 2 inches. take this number, multply by 25, divide by 7, and that's your approximate answer in inches.

for example, if a boat is 48 inches between the oarlocks, then the proper size is: 48/2=24+2=26. 26x25=650/7= approx. 93. That's 7 feet, 9 inches. thus, either 7-1/2 or 8 foot oars should work well.

performance rowers with a rowing shell may do it differently, but this formula works well for most rowing craft.
5 years, 6 months ago
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