Browning® Fishing SilaFlex Trigger Rods

   

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Length Power Other specs Quantity Price & availability

6'

Medium

Action:
Fast

Line Weight:
8-17 lbs.

Lure Weight:
1/18 - 1/2 oz.

Model:
SFX60MT

6'6"

Medium

Action:
Fast

Line Weight:
8-17 lbs.

Lure Weight:
1/18 - 1/2 oz.

Model:
SFX66MT

6'6"

Med Hvy

Action:
Fast

Line Weight:
6-17 lbs.

Lure Weight:
1/4 - 5/8 oz.

Model:
SFX66MHT

6'6"

Medium

Action:
Fast

Line Weight:
8-17 lbs.

Lure Weight:
1/8 - 1/2 oz.

Pieces:
2

Model:
SFX66MT-2

7'

Med Hvy

Action:
Fast

Line Weight:
10-20 lbs.

Lure Weight:
3/8 - 1 oz.

Model:
SFX70MHT
In the 1960's, Browning pioneered the development of fiberglass rods... and in so doing, created a legend. Crafted of proprietary Hi-Density tubular fiberglass, a SilaFlex rod offered the most advanced technology of the day--the ideal blend of light weight, strength, flexibility and sensitivity. Today's SilaFlex is true to the original (if you've owned one, your hand hasn't forgotten the feel!). Same quality blanks, same classic actions, upgraded with hard aluminum oxide guides, premium cork handles and lightweight graphite reel seats for exceptional handling all around.
Rated 4.4 out of 5 by 42 reviewers.
Rated 2 out of 5 by ok for young kids The rod is way to limber and you can not feel a fish hitting your bait. I used this rod for one fishing trip and the rod now belongs to my son. The rod is well built but has no back bone. April 24, 2013
Rated 5 out of 5 by Same Great Old SilaFlex! The Living Ledgend I have been fishing with Sila's since I started fishing at the age of 3 (no exaggeration there) and have caught an uncountable number of fish on these fiberglass brute's. In the couple hundred Sila's I have owned I have only broken 3 rods (all were my fault) and only one was a fishing related accident. I have caught everything on various years of these rods from sunfish to king salmon in Alaska, and a 4.5 hour engagement with a 10'6" white sturgeon on 15 lb test! Now Onto These New Rods... They have a parabolic action that has a slightly stiffer than comparable older generation rods, but this is better suited for modern applications such as Carolina rigs or top water lures. The grips are made of great quality cork and finished on both ends by a brass washer... something missing in other rods nowadays (it holds the handle together in dry environments). The reel seat is a thick pressed graphite that does a good job of transferring vibrations from the blank; it also has a section of exposed blank at the bottom of the seat for those fineness freaks among us. The guides are double footed guides that are typical on most modern rods so nothing special there. The guides have held up to heavy braid and mono in both casting and trolling applications with no signs of wear. The rod has no hook keep; Get Over It! Use the foot of one of the guides or buy one of the plastic ones that Fuji sells to rubber band onto the rod. If You Want A Rod With A More Bass Rod Type Action I Would Recommend Looking Into Wright&McGills S Curve Rods... There Just As Good January 16, 2013
Rated 5 out of 5 by super caster Paired with pro-qualifier baitcaster and a match made in heaven. Handles 5lb bass w/ ease and solid base power at butt end.. The missing hook keeper is never a problem with any rod you purchase; just buy a pack of mounting cable ties and attach to rod and problem solved. December 26, 2012
Rated 3 out of 5 by average I ordered the 7 foot long version. It casts far and accurately but I'm not terribly impressed. I've used it for casting cranks and spinnerbaits of various sizes. To me it's a typical $40-$50 rod with nothing to recommend it over any other rod, like an ugly stick for example. To me it doesn't have the magical feel of a fiberglass rod from the heyday of fiberglass rods. 3 stars is "average" and that's what I found this rod to be. October 5, 2012
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4 Questions | 21 Answers

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Q: 
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Guides

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How many guides does the 7' medium heavy have. Not including tip. All answers appreciated Thanks TIGHTLINES
1 year, 9 months ago
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 - Flowery Branch GA
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A: 
My 6'6" Browning has 6 guides.
1 year, 6 months ago
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 - San Jose, CA
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4 answers

Lure weight rating

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I was wondering if the lure ratings for this rod were a typo. It says the medium action silaflex TRIGGER rods are capable of casting 1/18 oz lures but the silaflex medium action SPINNING rods say the lightest lure capable of casting is 1/8.
2 years, 3 months ago
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A: 
Because This Is An Old School Parabolic Action (Like A Fly Rod) It Technically Will Cast 1/18 (or any weight that YOU can cast) But Yes 1/8 Is Printed On The Rod Blank
1 year, 3 months ago
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 - On The Road Again
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A: 
That was a typo about the lure ratings the real one is 1/4-5/8
1 year, 9 months ago
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 - Flowery Branch GA
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A: 
I belief this is a typo. 1/8 oz with a good light weight spinning or spin cast reel,but 1/18 oz I doubt it, but I could be wrong. I wouldn't purchase it with the intent of throwing something that small. I don't know that I've ever seen a 1/18th oz lure listed (Jig head). 1/16 but not 1/18th.
2 years, 3 months ago
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A: 
Your right, great question here. It is a min of 1/8oz for sure. Lighter then that it would not work.
2 years, 3 months ago
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 - Charlotte, NC
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I was wondering if that model would be ok for striper and maybe bluefish.
2 years, 8 months ago
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A: 
no, I hooked a 3lbs bass and had to take the boat to the fish. The medium does not have the back bone to pull in the fish.
11 months ago
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A: 
Indubitably, But It Would Be Light Tackle For Larger Blues And Stripes (But The Fiberglass Can Handle It Just Use Braid Line With a Shock Leader)
1 year, 3 months ago
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 - On The Road Again
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A: 
for smaller striper and bluefish but for bigger ones use a uglystik
1 year, 10 months ago
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 - Flowery Branch GA
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A: 
WAY TOO soft for that. It lacks the backbone to fight that kind of fish.
2 years, 3 months ago
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 - Charlotte, NC
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I would go with a 7'6 Heavy action bass pro shops carbon lite rod
2 years, 8 months ago
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11 answers

fiberglass over graphite?

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why would someone use a fiberglass rod blank over a graphite rod blank?
4 years, 9 months ago
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 - orlando, florida
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A: 
The material, graphite or fiberglass, isn't important. The important thing to me is what you want the rod to do. When I fish worms or jigs I usually want a stiff rod so I can set the hook and pull the hook through the plastic or weedguard. With crankbaits or other lures moving through the water, I want a more flexible rod that gives the fish time to mouth the lure. Graphite rods are usually stiffer than fiberglass rods so I have one of each that I use for the lure of choice. I hope this helps.
2 years, 8 months ago
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I think in my case that I find that the glass rod has a true moderate action which allows casting light baits longer yet the rod still has good hooksetting power. Graphite rods that claim to be moderate are still too stiff on the top third of the rod.
2 years, 8 months ago
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 - Madison, WI
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A: 
fiberglass, gives you more time when the fish stike you spinnerbait,buzz bait and chankbait to set the hook before you pull it away from him. more hookups. graphite you fill the fish alot of the time before he has the bait good and pull it away.
3 years, 1 month ago
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 - Southaven,Ms. 38671
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Fiberglass tends to be softer in action for rods of equal power ratings. The rod will arc more quickly and further down the rod blank when hooking and fighting fish. I use fiberglass for lighter spinner baits and topwater to allow a striking fish to swallow the bait before the rod is fully loaded up.
3 years, 1 month ago
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A: 
Generally fiberglass blanks are used specifically for ultralite applications and crankbait fishing. Fiberglass blanks have a softer action than graphite. This is an advantage when fishing crankbaits for multiple reasons. The moderate action can improve casting distance on lighter crankbaits, the decreased sensitivity of fiberglass has less of a dampening effect on deep diver crankbait action and the softer tip helps prevent ripping the treble hooks of a crankbait out of the fish's mouth on the hookset.
3 years, 9 months ago
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 - Grand Rapids, MI
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Many times using a graphite rod with a crank bait, you feel the fish when it bites so you set the hook and frequently pull it out of the fishes mouth. The fiberglass rod will flex so you don't feel the fish right when it bites. This delay allows the fish to the bait deeper into its mouth, where multiple trebles will hook it. This delay gets me more hookups that the bass don't throw if they jump.
3 years, 10 months ago
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 - Tallahassee, FL
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Graphite rods do not have the tensile strength that a fiberglass rod will have. They generally are more expensive and weigh less. Graphite is a good choice for a rod that you will be casting all day, as to where a fiberglass rod will be best for moderate casting, trolling, or bottom fishing. Some companies are beginning to produce a graphite and fiberglass hybrid rod that seems to give you the best of both worlds.
3 years, 10 months ago
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 - Glen Allen, VA
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It has more flex, giving a crankbait more action and tires the fishermans arm a lot less than graphite. However, if you were jigging a worm or tube the better choice would be graphite, since it would be more sensitive. My 2 cents!
3 years, 10 months ago
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 - Lexington, TN
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A: 
The fiberglass rod has more feel at the tip and the handle. It works like a parabolic rod.
3 years, 11 months ago
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 - Near Raleigh, North Carolina
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A: 
For me and the fishing I do where I do it, fibergalss is #1 for crankbait fishing!!!

I find the lighter/faster tips and the more flexible backbone strength of fiberglass rods just makes the lure run better. As well as make hook setting and retreival much more effecient and risk-free (fiberglass tends not to explode as graphite often can under pressure).

I am not against graphite rods - I own and use several.

I mostly fish bass and pickerel in fast moving, very clear (due to Zebra Mussels) Canadian rivers. You simply can't beat the performance and flexibilty of fiberglass in those conditions. Especially for Smallmouth Bass.
3 years, 11 months ago
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 - Toronto Canada
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A: 
alot of it is personal preferance. however a glass rod like these silaflexs are great for use on crankbaits and poppers. the reason being is the flex, when your rod flexs during retrieve the rod is allowing the lure to get its most action. on poppers they keep the bait from skipping on top of the water and actually allow the popping to occur. when you set the hook on a fish the flex of the rod keeps you from ripping the hook out. when you set the hook the rod flexs slightly more because the bait is in motion, when you set the hook with a stiff rod the rod with the set motion will pull the hooks out of the fishes mouth. even kvd fishes with a glass rod when he is cranking. but you are talking $40 compared to $90- 120. this rod is well worth it. use the savings to get more lures.
3 years, 11 months ago
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