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Bass Pro Shops® Lead Worm Weights

   

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Size
Product Color
Quantity Other specs Quantity Price & availability

1/32 oz.

Natural

25

Model:
BP-1/32
  • $3.49

  • SKU: 574196

  • In Stock
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1/16 oz.

Natural

25

Model:
BP-1/16
  • $3.49

  • SKU: 574200

  • In Stock
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1/8 oz.

Natural

25

Model:
BP-1/8
  • $3.79

  • SKU: 574202

  • In Stock
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3/16 oz.

Natural

25

Model:
BP-3/16
  • $3.99

  • SKU: 574204

  • In Stock
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1/4 oz.

Natural

15

Model:
BPBW14
  • $4.49

  • SKU: 1464816

  • In Stock
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5/16 oz.

Natural

15

Model:
BPBW516
  • $4.49

  • SKU: 1464819

  • In Stock
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3/8 oz.

Natural

15

Model:
BPBW38
  • $4.49

  • SKU: 1464818

  • In Stock
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1/2 oz.

Natural

15

Model:
BPBW12
  • $5.49

  • SKU: 1464815

  • In Stock
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3/4 oz.

Natural

15

Model:
BPBW34
  • $7.99

  • SKU: 1464817

  • In Stock
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1 oz.

Natural

15

Model:
BPBW1
  • $9.99

  • SKU: 1464814

  • In Stock
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1/32 oz.

Natural

100

Model:
BPC-1/32
  • $8.49

  • SKU: 574217

  • In Stock
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1/16 oz.

Natural

100

Model:
BPC-1/16
  • $8.49

  • SKU: 574220

  • In Stock
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1/8 oz.

Natural

100

Model:
BPC-1/8
  • $9.49

  • SKU: 574221

  • In Stock
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3/16 oz.

Natural

75

Model:
BPBWB316
  • $9.79

  • SKU: 1464865

  • In Stock
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1/4 oz.

Natural

60

Model:
BPBWB14
  • $9.79

  • SKU: 1464864

  • In Stock
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5/16 oz.

Natural

50

Model:
BPBWB516
  • $11.49

  • SKU: 1464867

  • In Stock
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3/8 oz.

Natural

50

Model:
BPBWB38
  • $11.49

  • SKU: 1464866

  • In Stock
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1/2 oz.

Natural

60

Model:
BPBWB12
  • $17.99

  • SKU: 1464863

  • In Stock
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All of our weights have concave bases to fit against the worm's head and a .062'' hole for easy rigging.
Bass Pro Shops® Lead Worm Weights 4.6 5 47 47
Great Weight Great weight for the money, the hole is big enough that you can insert a rubber peg quickly and easily November 3, 2013
Bass Pro Shops® Lead Worm Weight Review The Bass Pro Shops lead worm weights are well machined and a good value for the money. August 25, 2013
lead worm weights A lead weight is a lead weight. The deal here is the price and number value you get. More bang for your buck. June 19, 2013
A staple for every tool box These weights are easy to use and extremely affordable. As with all lead bullet weights, the holes on each end may have jagged rims, so I always roll the point of a knife blade or the point of a large hook around the hole to remove any burrs that could tear up my line. June 8, 2013
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4 Questions | 32 Answers

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Details: 
Haha, im new to using worms, and i have no idea as to how these weights are used with them, so could anyone explain this?
3 years, 7 months ago
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Top 10 Contributor
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A: 
you weight goes on your line ahead of the hook. once the hook is on the line, you push the weight down so that it's sitting right on to of the eye of the hook. You then put the hook through the end of the worm and slide the worm all the way up the hook to the eye so that the weight covers the end of the worm. You then imbed the lower part of the hook to the upper middle of the worm so that it's not exposed. This is a Texas Rig.
1 year, 3 months ago
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A: 
These weights are used for Texas-rigging and/or Carolina-rigging soft plastic lures. You start off by threading your fishing line through the pointed tip of the weight, then you can thread the line through a small, glass bead to add a clacking sound (optional), then you tie the end of the line to your hook of choice. This rig is designed to drag or hop your plastic lure along the bottom of the lake/river.
1 year, 5 months ago
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A: 
Slip the worm weight, pointed end first, on to your line. Tie your hook, recommend a 4/0 offset, to the line and then Texas rig your worm so that it is weedless. When you feel the fish, set the hook HARD!
3 years, 5 months ago
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 - Grand Junction, CO
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A: 
To texas rig a worm, string this weight on your line and then tie on your hook. Reel the worm in with your rod tip up , dropping it parallel with the water and bringing it back up. The weight will slide up and down the line causing your worm, lizzard or creature bait to "swim"
3 years, 6 months ago
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A: 
Not meant for use with plastic worms. They are inserted into a tube style bait and the hook is then inserted through the weight, turned around,and inserted back into the tube..texas style.
3 years, 7 months ago
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Details: 
I heard that the production of lead weights is going to be stopped because of the environmental impact. Does anyone know if this is this true?
3 years, 11 months ago
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Top 10 Contributor
A: 
My understanding is that the laws will vary from US state to US state. It is similar to lead shot being used for duck hunting. Many states require that only steel shot can be used over water areas.
1 year, 3 months ago
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A: 
No way. Like 2-stroke motors, they are just to economical to outlaw. Obviously, you can spend more money on tungsten or perhaps a little less on steel, but banning the use of lead for fishing would really hurt the industry IMO, at least at first.
1 year, 5 months ago
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A: 
No, the lead thing for fishing got stopped for now. Folks need to be more concerned about the oil and gas slicks being put on our waters by these gigantic boats.
3 years, 10 months ago
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A: 
Most likely will as lead is hard on the environment and look at the lead shot for duck and goose hunting!!!! Its almost gone!
3 years, 10 months ago
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 - East Tennessee
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A: 
I have heard that some states already have bans on lead. Haven't heard anything about it around here,SC.
3 years, 11 months ago
by
Anonymous
 - Ridgeville,SC
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A: 
You know, they (mostly environmentalist)
have been saying that for years. I have never met a bass with cancer yet. And
I have met a lot of bass! I feel that the
fishermen have a lot more to worry about
than lead weights. If a person worries about
handling these weights, because of the
lead, simply paint them.
3 years, 11 months ago
by
 - Redmond, Oregon
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Q: 
11 answers

1/16 or 1/8 oz

Details: 
I am going to be using these for texas rigging Zoom's tiny brush hogs. THe bass on my part of the lake aren't that big and got the smallest brush hogs i could find got #1 hooks and tryin to find which size weight so wat do u think, the 1/16 0z or the 1/8 oz.
5 years ago
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A: 
Both can work but I would think the 1/16 will be a tighter fit.
1 year, 3 months ago
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Top 50 Contributor
A: 
I also use the Tiny Brush Hogs (smaller than Baby Brush Hogs) for the same reason. I have - bunch of the 1/8 oz BPS bullet weights, and I can tell you that they would be too big for that lure; go with the 1/16 oz., or better yet, pinch on a size 4 split shot about 12" above the hook and use it like a mini Carolina rig (the "split shot rig"). Good luck!
1 year, 5 months ago
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A: 
Hook size is OK. If the fishing depth is less than 10 1/16 should be used. If deeper or fishing in a river with current go to a 1/8.
3 years, 8 months ago
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A: 
I usually use the baby brush hogs with no weight at all with a 2/0 hook, especially in cooler water. This will get strikes from big bass also. The less weight the better.
3 years, 11 months ago
by
Anonymous
 - Ridgeville,SC
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A: 
You know, size of bass is not important,
because large and small bass will eat any thing, at certain times. I know for certain
that small bass will hit prey (or objects)
5 times there size. If I were fishing your part of the lake, I would want to catch the largest one in that area. So having said that, since
you have small brush hogs, and have # 1
hooks, You need to figure out how slow you want it to fall. because bass are smart, and know when something's not
right. If your water is shallow, and the current is not strong, Use the 1/16 oz.
However, if there are dense weeds, or
deep water, or strong wind, go 1/8th oz.
3 years, 11 months ago
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 - Redmond, Oregon
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A: 
both would work out great in that rig....
4 years, 3 months ago
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 - rochester ny
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A: 
depends on wind and current... always use the lightest weight possible
4 years, 3 months ago
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 - Central Fl. PA & NJ
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Top 25 Contributor
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A: 
Get a few diff size weights so you got um and experiment with weight size
4 years, 5 months ago
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 - East wareham, Mass
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A: 
depending on the turbidity of the water and current the best weight choice might differ. if the water is clean and the current is weak use the /16 ounce. if it is even a little rough i would use the 1/8 ounce
4 years, 6 months ago
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A: 
You really can use either weight just depends on how fast of a drop you want on your bait.
4 years, 6 months ago
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 - Pierre part, LA
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A: 
1/8 is a good starting point
4 years, 9 months ago
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 - Tri City Park, CA
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Details: 
i'm trying to get started on a Carolina rig and i wanna know whether to get the weights and bead and etc. or just buy the Carolina rig shortcut that BPS offers.
5 years, 8 months ago
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 - Wagener, SC
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A: 
These weights will work for Carolina rigging provided you are on a hard bottom or small rocks bottom, if you are going to be fishing around larger rocks say the size of basketballs you may want to go to a cylinder weight that is less likely to wedge between rocks.
1 year ago
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A: 
Yes, but be careful of using too light of a weight.. Carolina rigging is used for fishing on the bottom. You'll probably will want to used at least 1/2 ounce weight.
1 year, 3 months ago
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A: 
Those "pre-assembled" C-rigs are no bueno simply because there isn't enough distance between the sinker and your lure (12" minimum, IMO). Buy these bullet weights and tie your own rigs. I recommend using a high tensile strength braid (e.g., 30-50 lbs test) for your main line, then tie on a 15-20 lbs test mono or fluoro leader on the business end of the swivel. That way, if you have to break off the leader, half of your rigs is still preserved and you can easily put another rig back together.
1 year, 5 months ago
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A: 
YES! Current should determine the weight! If in heavy current use heavier weight. If well below the dam in an area of the river that has good current but not heavy current use a smaller weight and worm, and let the current deliver the bait. Keep a tight line! Action will be fast!
3 years, 10 months ago
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 - East Tennessee
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A: 
I like the bead method the best. I use braid line and run it through the eye of the bead twice to make it adjustable without reting knotts.
3 years, 11 months ago
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Anonymous
 - Ridgeville,SC
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A: 
That totally depends on the individual. I
personally add different applications to
the Carolina rigs. Like different weights,
or different glass beads, different colored
beads, some faceted, some smooth and round. I may make it only 24" instead of
36". There are many variations to the
Carolina rig. Use your imagination, you
may invent something that works better.
Thats how the split shot rig came about.
3 years, 11 months ago
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 - Redmond, Oregon
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A: 
i like to make my own for the various colors and the water conditions
4 years, 3 months ago
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 - rochester ny
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A: 
both will work... well -- If you need to rig specific do your own if not get the pre rig
4 years, 3 months ago
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 - Central Fl. PA & NJ
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A: 
Both are good ideas
4 years, 5 months ago
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 - East wareham, Mass
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A: 
A Carolina rig is usually used in a situation in which the water is dirty or unclear, with low visibility. The purpose of the rig is to make alot of noise that will attract fish, which is done by the bead and the bullet weight clicking together, which will travel very far in water and get the fish's attention. This is about the best lead weight out there, in my opinion, but tungsten weights are better all around weights, because they are louder and more heavy for a smaller size, but they are more expensive. I haven't used the shortcut rig, but it didn't look very good to me. I have also found that the beads Bass Pro Shops makes, they are called "faceted glass beads" because glass beads are much louder than plastic.
5 years, 8 months ago
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